14 results for author: Stephanie


Archives of crisis and conspiracy: The digital future

The latest Shock of Record partnership seminar with the Institute of Historic Research is now available to view on YouTube.  The video has captions. The webinar considers how memory institutions and other organisations conduct rapid response archiving to capture the digital records of crisis, how they decide what to include and exclude, and how and when those born-digital archives should be made available to researchers and the wider public. It will also consider how huge digital archives, which may contain multiple forms of misinformation, can be effectively described and contextualised when close reading and cataloguing are not possible. Th...

Janette Harley Prize 2022 Open for Entries

Entry to the 2022 Janette Harley Prize is now open. The prize is intended to generate interest in archives, and raise awareness of research and achievements in the world of archives. The prizewinner in 2021 was Dr Amy L Erickson, Robinson College, Cambridge, for City Women in the 18th Century, a free open-air exhibition in autumn 2019 about women who ran luxury businesses in the City of London in the 18th century; and a supporting article, ‘Esther Sleepe, fanmaker, and her family’, Eighteenth-Century Life, 42 (2) (2018), pp.15-37. The closing date for entries to the 2022 Janette Harley Prize is 31 July. The winning entry will be ...

The 2022 Maurice Bond Lecture – Covid and the Historian

The BRA’s Maurice Bond Memorial Lecture, delayed by Covid, was delivered at Guildhall Library on 23 February 2022. The speaker was Martin Daunton, Emeritus Professor of Economic History at the University of Cambridge and Visiting Professor at Gresham College. His subject was 'Covid and the Historian'. In a wide-ranging survey, Professor Daunton reflected on how the experience of the Covid pandemic will cause historians to look afresh at past crises, with greater understanding and from a new standpoint. The 1919 epidemic of Spanish Flu was one of his examples. He found it strange that scholars writing soon after the event more or less ignored ...